Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist

Lane DeGregory

Lane DeGregory is a listener, a writer, a teacher. She loves true stories, intimate details and big ideas. She interviews strangers and writes about real people, some famous, but mostly folks struggling in the shadows.

In 30 years, she has shared more than 3,000 stories in newspapers and magazines: A feral child who gets adopted, an old man determined to end his own life, a young girl whose dad dropped her off a bridge.

She has won dozens of national awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing.

Read her stories. Listen to her podcast: WriteLane.

Connect with characters you can’t forget.

2009 Pulitzer Prize Winner

The Girl in the Window

SHE WAS FOUND curled up in a filthy room, unable to speak or make eye contact. They called her a feral child. Could love and caring make up for a lifetime of neglect?

… And Other True Tales

“The Girl in the Window And Other True Tales”

Has Just Been Released Via the University Of Chicago Press

“Thank you for being a part of the Writer’s Fair March 24th in Venice. Mary and I were so appreciative of your talk, the sharing of your insights to publishing, and the time you spent with us that day and the following day at the Book fair in the park.

 

As I began reading “The Girl In The Window” my immediate response was, “Wow!” “Wow” for the succinct wording. “Wow” for the adjectives and their usage. “Wow” for the stunning amount of information conveyed in short short stories. “Wow” for how you plunged me into people’s lives and thoughts and circumstances again and again in a few words!

 

Your book has become an immediate treasure to me, spilling over into everything I am. “Wow” indeed!

Hopeful of sometime in the near future of hearing and learning from you over a cup of my home roasted coffee (pretty good stuff) or even a coffee shop.

There are books inside me that will be coming out, and when they do they’ll be the better because of you.”

2009 Pulitzer Prize Winner

Girl in the Window

SHE WAS FOUND curled up in a filthy room, unable to speak or make eye contact. They called her a feral child. Could love and caring make up for a lifetime of neglect?

… And Other True Tales

“Thank you for being a part of the Writer’s Fair March 24th in Venice. Mary and I were so appreciative of your talk, the sharing of your insights to publishing, and the time you spent with us that day and the following day at the Book fair in the park.

 

As I began reading “The Girl In The Window” my immediate response was, “Wow!” “Wow” for the succinct wording. “Wow” for the adjectives and their usage. “Wow” for the stunning amount of information conveyed in short short stories. “Wow” for how you plunged me into people’s lives and thoughts and circumstances again and again in a few words!

 

Your book has become an immediate treasure to me, spilling over into everything I am. “Wow” indeed!

Hopeful of sometime in the near future of hearing and learning from you over a cup of my home roasted coffee (pretty good stuff) or even a coffee shop.

There are books inside me that will be coming out, and when they do they’ll be the better because of you.”

Other Stories

Girl in the Window, 10 Years Later

No one had any expectations. But there was hope: maybe she had been found early enough.

At 99, a St. Petersburg Man Finds Meaning in the Working Life

He says he keeps going because the people at Bama depend on him. “I cannot let them down. They need me.”

One Way Out: Teenage Football Player Longs to Escape Pahokee

All year, college football coaches had been sending him letters telling him how much they wanted him. Wake Forest, Youngstown State and Mars Hill. Schools he had never heard of, in states he had never seen.

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“If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth writing.”

– Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanac

YouTube Talks

Developing Sources

Developing Your Voice

YouTube Talks

Developing Sources

Developing Your Voice